The Conference Blueprint – Part 3; Event Outcomes

The Conference Blueprint – Part 3; Event Outcomes

Conference Blueprint Part 3; What do you want your delegates to THINK, FEEL and DO…

 

 

Ok, so we’ve locked down the objectives and allocated key roles and responsibilities.

 

We are in good shape. All we have to do now is to remember that we have an audience at this conference, and everything will be fine…

What are your desired outcomes?

We’ve all attended conferences, meetings and workshops where the venue was fantastic, the catering wonderful and the conference hall stunning and yet still come away thinking and feeling a bit, well, meh!

That is to say, underwhelmed, or even bored!

The temptation to use a conference as an opportunity to tell people everything whilst they are a captive audience is often too high. This is where the next section of the Conference Planning Blueprint can help.

By identifying in advance, what you want the audience to THINK, FEEL and DO then this can provide an easy reference point during the design and delivery process.

 

If a part of the conference is not helping to achieve one of these mindset shifts, then why are you doing it?

By agreeing what you want people to THINK, FEEL and DO, before, during and after the conference, you create agreed criteria on which to make key design decisions as well as a reference point for measuring the event’s success.

1. Helping people to THINK differently

Consider here how you can offer new interesting information or content. Be provocative in the material presented and give people time to consider, challenge and reflect on external perspectives or latest business insight.

When you are considering conveying important information or knowledge then don’t assume it needs to be a procession of presentations, and there are plenty of ways to keep the audience interested. Breakouts, pairs’ discussion, polling, Q&A and the most basic of interactions, asking for thoughts and opinions as you go.

 

2. Changing how people FEEL

If you’re bored during a conference, it’s normally because the designers haven’t really considered the effect of their content on the participants. It is important to consider what audiences want and need. In the theatre, actors and directors know to keep the audience interested and how to tap into their emotions.

If the performance isn’t engaging the audience, then it is ultimately self-indulgent and alienating. Audiences want to be engaged, entertained and kept ‘in’ it from beginning to end.

Consider a theatre production or film you still remember. It is likely to be because it grabbed you emotionally in some way.

To ensure that your audience are staying with you, you must involve them. It’s why in the tradition of the British Pantomime, the audience is asked all the time to help (oh no they’re not, oh yes they are…..let’s leave that there shall we).

Now, we are not asking you to ensure you have a magic lamp at your conference, or ask your leaders to dress up as Cinderella (although…..) but we are suggesting that if you want your messages to land and your conference to have lasting impact then consider how you want them to feel and how you can effectively introduce emotions into the agenda.

Creating shared experiences is one way of doing this in a conference setting. The same as in a pantomime, where the audience are brought together by their dislike of the villain, a conference can create opportunities for people to bond and build relationships.

3. What do you want people to DO?

Even if you have expertly conveyed new and provocative thinking and captured the emotions of the audience effectively, this may all still result in post-conference inaction if delegates are not adequately equipped.

What tools could be useful to take back to the day job? What skills might need to be developed in order to carry out the desired actions? What obstacles can you remove in order to make taking action easier?

The Conference Blueprint is purposely designed to ensure that you can’t capture hundreds of actions in this section! Be selective about the call to actions you agree on and challenge yourself and your stakeholders to ensure that these actions will be the ones that result in the shift you are wanting to achieve.

Why is documenting outcomes so important?

It’s essential to consider your audience because they are the ones who will be having to implement any changes that result from the conference.

Undoubtedly one of the conference’s objectives will be around a new initiative or mindset shift or behavioural change and only by considering your audience and their emotional and intellectual state, will you be able to ensure that they understand, appreciate and ultimately act on those objectives.

By using the Conference Blueprint to agree and document these outcomes then you are able to use them as the criteria on which to base agenda or timing decisions as well as measure the success of the conference post event.

It seems obvious to consider your audience doesn’t it, and yet we can so easily get caught up in the content, the theme, the speakers, and end up neglecting the most important component – the attendees. Don’t forget your audience. They are the ones who are going back after the conference and delivering all the things you want them to as a result of attending. They are your best bet for ensuring it was a success and they will be telling you in the feedback whether it was or not from their perspective.

And then, after it’s all finished and the planning and delivery is a faint memory, you can proudly shout out to yourself and anyone else listening, in true pantomime fashion, ‘IT’S BEHIND YOU!’.

Download the full Conference Planning Blueprint here…

If you want to tap into our conference planning expertise, then please do feel free to contact us here.

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The Conference Blueprint – Part 2; Roles and Partners

The Conference Blueprint – Part 2; Roles and Partners

Who owns the tracker owns the conference.

We look at how to build a solid conference with real meaning. Giving away our FREE conference blueprint.

In Part 1 of this Conference Blueprint series, we described how important it was to know why you are holding a conference and choosing and sticking to a super-objective.

In Part 2, we look at how to best ensure that what you plan will actually happen. As the old saying goes, there is ‘many a slip twixt cup and lip’. Or as we prefer to say, somewhat tongue-in-cheek as a conference approaches, what can possibly go wrong?

We all know that the answer is quite a lot but keeping it in mind is as good an insurance policy as any. Mmmm, insurance. Now there’s another thing – perhaps for another day.

The Core Design Team

The one thing most likely to create a successful outcome at your conference, is a tight design and execution team. Small, (4 or 5 maximum) with the decision-making authority and the recognition that they are ultimately accountable to the key sponsor or conference owner.

This team, although it will consult and communicate with a wide range of stakeholders and internal and external partners, is best served if the accountability rests firmly with them and that everyone recognizes their authority. We have all heard the somewhat derogatory ‘designed by committee’ when things don’t go well, but rather than overly complicated multiple layers of authority, making decision-making unwieldy, instead make sure the steering co is few in number and with a clear vested interest in the success of the event. It’s a great opportunity for inexperienced leaders to step up.

External Partners in Conferences

It isn’t advisable to produce large events without skilled partners and we have been invited to design and deliver conferences many times in the past where the opening conversation has started something like this. “We produced the whole thing internally last time …never again!”

This isn’t true for everyone and there is no doubting the richness of the conference experience when an in-house team creates and executes a fabulous conference, but by and large, trusted partners really can and do help.

Trusted is the key word here and whilst recognising that significant budgets are at play, don’t be tempted to micro-manage your partners, but instead place your trust in them and keep communication frequent and at a good level of detail. It pays to check and double check of course, but let that responsibility lie with the partner.

There are one or two watch outs here. Once you are comfortable with your choice of partners, be very clear when providing the brief.

Avoid cross-over. If an external partner and an internal function both think they are responsible for the afternoon session on day 2, well it’s going to take some time to sort out who is doing/creating/providing what. Mind you, better that than nobody being responsible at all.

Beware scope creep. It is very tempting for external companies to suggest themselves for additional services, when perhaps it isn’t their core offering. The phrase to listen out for is “We can do that as well if you like…” If it wasn’t part of the original discussions, there’s probably a good reason.

Although it was painful at the time, we are forever grateful for the advice from a CEO we have worked with for many years. He advised us, after a particularly huge event had over-stretched our capability, to make a list of what we don’t do, as well as what we do. It’s been very helpful on a number of occasions, especially when clients ask late in the process if we can ‘create a few slides’. We’ve learnt to say a kind but firm no to that one.

Lastly, on the partner front, don’t be tempted to bargain by playing partners off against each other. Although it may seem a reasonable negotiation tactic, it doesn’t help to build relationships over the long term. The very last thing you want is one or more partners feeling disenfranchised when you drop or replace their services in favour of another.

If it’s possible, when the negotiating and contractual matters are out of the way, bring all the partners together and brief them on the super-objective as well as the execution. In our experience, every team works best together if they know not just what they are doing but why. If food and beverage know what the producers are trying to achieve and why the facilitation or presentation team require changes in the usual routine, it helps if they have already built a working relationship.

Keeping the event organisation under control

And so on to The Master Tracker! Every team knows the one person who possesses zen-like understanding of spreadsheets (hint – in this instance it is not the author of this article) and every team needs that person.

Each partner organization will have their own specific ways of being able to report on what is ready, what is in-progress and what hasn’t yet started. They are also unlikely to be of much use to each other. When we work with our preferred production partner, MCL, for example, we feel comfortable that they have their complex technical documents covering every piece of staging/lighting/sound equipment etc., but if they show it to us, quite frankly it gives us a headache.

What we really need to know is that the frontline for the band is booked and fits their spec and that they can rehearse from 6pm. What each player wants to know is that everything they need is in its place.

A Purple Monster detailed running order shows the flow of the delegate experience and is a perfect facilitator’s guide to who is doing what when, but it isn’t useful for those in charge of logistics or for food and beverage. So, someone has to be able to track the big picture.

For each moving part of the conference, one individual should have the role of reporting its status and recording it on the master spreadsheet or tracker.

The logistics company are keeping it up to date with hotel rooms, transport, visas etc; internal supply chain are reporting on product displays; Purple Monster are liaising with executive assistants for rehearsal scheduling and an external agency has booked the dancing dog.

Okay, we must admit, we’ve never booked a dancing dog, but we live in hope.

The key factor is that someone, a special someone, must be that single point of accountability and know just how each and every moving part fits in and where it’s up to. It is, I’m afraid, one of the many thankless tasks of a conference. That said, any self-respecting conference would remember to thank them at the end.
Finally – there are two things we know to be absolutely true. Pretty much every conference we have ever played a part in follows these two strict rules.

1. Despite everything pointing to the contrary and no matter how many times the deadline is stressed to the presenters, the final power point slides will not be ready until … about 10 minutes before the start of the conference.

2. Nothing ever goes totally to plan, so you will need a contingency budget and a mindset that is always open to change. Always expect the unexpected.

Over the years we have had many things disrupt the perfectly planned conference. CEO running accidents, travel chaos, power-cuts, wet weather, hot weather, hot and wet weather and the delivery of a pop-up princess castle in error. There are many things that can disrupt your conference, but a tight team with committed and trusted partners can overcome …anything.

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Conference Blueprint – Part 1; Why even have a conference?

Conference Blueprint – Part 1; Why even have a conference?

The Conference Super-Objective

We look at how to build a solid conference with real meaning. Giving away our FREE conference blueprint.

As soon as the idea of a conference makes it onto an executive plan, it immediately triggers a series of questions. This prompts the owner or sponsor, to find an individual or group of people to supply the answers.

The list is not a short one and it can be overwhelming, especially if this is your first time and your conference has a lot of moving parts.

Where is it?
When is it?
Who is speaking?
What’s the budget?
How many attendees?
Which parts of the business?

And so on. That’s before we’ve even begun to consider content.

If somewhere in this picture is you, then read on, as we create a short Purple Monster series on The Conference Blueprint.

We’re going to prioritise the questions, first on the list, is one that sometimes seems to be forgotten and yet we believe it to be the most important. We call it the Super-Objective, but it might be more simply expressed as…

“Why are you having a conference?”

The term ‘Super-Objective’ is borrowed from Constantin Stanislavsky’s ‘An Actor Prepares’. The Russian theatre practitioner used it to describe a character’s through line, the one goal or objective that drives them through the whole play and is more important than any other motivation.

At the start of planning a conference, you need to know what it is. The challenge of course is finding out what it is in the first place and then aligning everyone else to it. However, be assured that the very best conferences are not a series of bits and pieces loosely tied together, but instead a carefully constructed journey that is heading towards that one goal.

One of the key challenges is that the moment you mention a conference, everybody wants a piece of it. There are many different reasons. Some see an opportunity to get their crucial project in front of everyone; others to make an impact with senior management; others because …well because they’ve been told to by someone else.

Whatever the reason, if you’re part of the organizing effort, expect folk to come out of the woodwork, right up to and including the day of the conference.

Chip and Dan Heath in their book ‘Made to Stick’ share a great story that examples this. When Jeff Hawkins led the Palm Pilot team, to ensure an elegant design and avoid ‘feature creep’, he carried around a piece of wood, exactly to size and when an engineer suggested a new feature that needed an additional port, he asked them where it would go on the already allocated space on his wooden block.

You might wish to do a similar thing with the conference plan in order to avoid ‘conference creep’ .

Sitting under the super objective are the other ideals you would like the conference to bring home. These ‘objectives’ should sit within your content. You want great content; well written, well prepared, well rehearsed and engaging.

Firstly, don’t have too much. If you drown the audience in content, they will remember none of it. If it’s just information you could have sent in an email, then you are not doing your delegates any favours.

Secondly, each objective must still lead to the Super-Objective. They are signposts on the way to the end goal. If it’s a new operating model, then ‘ways of working’ is a good fit and will still drive you in the right direction.

We had an example recently of a senior leader trying to shoe-horn a piece of content into the conference, where it didn’t belong. Although the topic was perfectly fine, it didn’t contribute to the Super-Objective. It was like watching a film be interrupted by the commercials, rather than a great bit of sub-plot adding to the narrative.

We’ll cover many other aspects of the conference blueprint as we progress this mini-series, but we wanted to finish with measurement. How do you know the conference has been a success? Well this is where the Super-Objective is very helpful.

Instead of sending out post-event surveys that prompt questions like:
Was the catering to your liking? Or
Did the guest speaker
a) Disappoint
b) Satisfy requirements or
c) Exceed expectations?, you can ask more open questions, yet specific.

“Do you know why we held the conference?”

“What difference has the conference made to your attitude and behaviour?”

If you have carefully planned what the delegate journey looks like and you can point to all the key moments in which the Super-Objective was hammered home with impact, then you can be confident that the delegates will respond in the way you would like them to.

The conference was worthwhile and of value.

Although surveys and word of mouth reporting are good indicators, what you really want to measure is the business impact. We’ll discuss in the next article the idea of what delegates might think feel and do, but as far as the conference through line is concerned, it must make a difference to business results in some way.

You may be looking for better engagement scores or better productivity; a shift in D&I thinking that results in more women in the boardroom; an increase in retention figures or simply more people phoning each other. Whatever you decide, having this clear goal/mission/Super-Objective will make a real difference and make it measurable.

 



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Bringing energy to break-out session playback

Bringing energy to break-out session playback

A SUCCES story of breakout reporting.

During a conference last week in Dubrovnik for a global client, we used, as we often do, one of our favourite frameworks – SUCCES – from the book ‘Made to Stick’ by Chip and Dan Heath. They identify 6 key elements that make an idea effective and ‘sticky’ in the minds of the listeners. You don’t need every element to make an idea stick, but the more of them you have the better. Based on their research, the stickiest ideas have the following traits.

SIMPLE

UNEXPECTED

CONCRETE

CREDIBLE

EMOTIONAL

STORIES

There were two ways during the week in which this model was used to impactful effect. One was our practical application during the conference and the other was a story, told by a wonderful tour guide sharing the history of the old town of Dubrovnik.

The practical application – Bringing energy to breakout group playback

One of the challenges of large conferences and meetings is the over long and unduly repetitive ‘report backs’ from breakout sessions. What may have been a robust, lively, interesting and important discussion during the breakout can be reduced to a bland meander when played back to the plenary session by the elected representative.

Often the chosen speaker is dutifully reporting everything that was discussed but hasn’t really had time to edit it. This is further compounded by the repetition of the same points by the following groups. Somehow the requirement to be fair and include every breakout group’s feedback outweighs the common sense of not needing to hear the same point 15 times.

It really can reach the ‘losing the will to live’ moment well before the last group have brought forward their flipchart.

So, here’s a big hurrah for the Heath Brothers, because in our experience, the introduction of their model changes the way the group thinks about sharing their ideas. Last week was typical and we were inundated by people thanking us for making the session engaging, entertaining and most importantly, memorable.

Plenty of the ideas were made sticky and are going to bring about real change. They injected energy and purpose into the feedback, rather than sapping it. Alongside the model, we encouraged the participants to consult with the monsters, so they had every chance of ‘bringing their content to life’.

We encouraged the use of live music, theatre, film, dance and any and every other creative avenue. We’re delighted to report that the delegates ran with the ball.

With a focus on agility and adaptability, no group was worried about trying to be perfect and instead, put across their SIMPLE ideas in UNEXPECTED ways, using CONCRETE imagery and examples, with CREDIBLE statistics and every group, without fail, locked on to the EMOTIONAL hook and used STORY to make their point.

There were 10 groups to hear back and the time flew, making the session both enjoyable and effective.

Download more information on the SUCCES framework here  

The Tour Guide Story

The guide was well informed and engaging and shared lots of information and stories, including the wonderful fact that the head of state (the Rector) only had an elected term of 30 days and during that time, wasn’t allowed out. food for thought. One story though, really stuck with our intrepid monster tourists. Dubrovnik has a rich history, including many periods of strife and many of affluence, due to its reputation for trade and diplomacy.

At various points in history, the town was faced with devastation, famously from a huge earthquake in 1667, but on many occasions by fire.

In an attempt to make the town safer, the city council wanted to encourage householders to use more stone in construction than wood, but of course it was more expensive, so how could they influence a change in behaviour that would mean more expense for the inhabitants?

The answer – pass a law stating that only those people with stone houses would be allowed to keep and store wine on the premises and not those in wooden homes.

We leave you to consider whether or not this was an effective catalyst for change, but just a glance at the picture below, reveals a town famous for its beauty and …for its limestone and marble

If you want to know more about ideas that stick, or how to ensure that your breakout sessions have fabulous report outs, then get in touch with The Monster’s.  



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Global Leadership Conference; How did it go?!

Global Leadership Conference; How did it go?!

In a previous article all about the preparation process for a global leadership conference, we asked the question, ‘what could possibly go wrong?’ It seemed fitting, to share what actually happened. Plus of course, we share what went so well and why.

Speaker rehearsal

We always try and make sure it happens but for a variety of reasons often leaders are reluctant or unable to do a full rehearsal. Not in this case. Every executive featured in the main sessions, put in quality rehearsal time. Fabulously supported by the technical crew from the event production partners. It was especially valuable because the room layout meant this meeting was conducted with a stage in the middle of the room.

Different and brilliant!

 

Contingency plans

Yes, the unexpected happened. Of course it did. A senior executive was unable to be present for one day and so others stepped in, slides were adjusted, scripts re-written and all of it achieved calmly and in good time.

The key is not focus on why it has gone wrong or worse, who is at fault. The key is to work together to fix whatever it was. An experienced team, as was the case at this event, will have the knowledge as to what can be done in time to fix any issue that comes up and the skills to make that solution happen. 

Keep to Time

The efficient movement of 240 delegates around breakout spaces, lunch, external trips was no picnic, but nothing was dropped and the biggest overrun was 15 mins, which we gradually caught up through the day. Result!

It helps to have someone assigned to oversee timings and even better if this person has the knowledge about the event to decide, in the moment, if a section needs cutting or where time can be made up without damaging the integrity of the whole agenda design. 

 

In the moment.

It was a long week for the global delegates, but they really did stay incredibly engaged throughout. This is down to a combination of factors one of which is the positive culture this organisation has in the first place. It was also down to a very well considered agenda, fiercely protected reflection time and of course – high energy facilitators!   

 

Flex

There were one or two minor tensions in the week about what could be done when and by who, but the pressure to flex to meet the inevitable changing requirements often falls to the venue team. An event can quickly fall apart if they are not willing to help you out when needed. Building good relationships with this team, keeping them informed as things change and be willing to get stuck in when required all creates an atmosphere of collaboration and willingness to help. 

Teamwork

We said last week that provided the team could work well together, you could pretty much solve anything and that proved to be the case. 

The world-class Core Design team from Purple Monster and the client. 

Our very own Robin Fritz and Haley Rushing from The Purpose Institute.

The story

Teamwork really is the story here and it’s worth mentioning why our relationship with this particular client and the two individuals we work most closely with, is so special, we hope from their side as well as ours. 

First, they are willing to place their trust in us, even when we are pushing the creative boundaries. They understand that the hours spent in detailed design, creates a seamless conference with both a logical and emotional flow.

They are willing to engage in difficult conversations to get everyone on board – this in the face of knowing that the financial management as well as the delegate experience will all come down to them. If the conference is a success, they will be thanked for doing their job. If it’s a failure, the buck stops with them. Despite this obvious pressure, we always know we have their full support.

Everyone played their part in full and probably the most obvious expression of this was the creation of the ‘world bazaar’ exhibition. For logistical reasons, there was a very short window of an hour to transform 15 ‘booths’ from shell form, to fully stocked displays from around the globe, each with its own unique story and regional flavour. We would love to be able to share a time-lapse film of the set-up, but nobody had enough time on their hands to be filming.

It was not just the speed with which the whole thing was assembled that stood out, nor was it the fact that simply everybody (and we mean everybody) pitched in. It was more that it was done with such good grace; with fun, collaboration, sharing tools and know-how and mostly, well, sweat really.

There were so many highlights to the conference. Hayley Rushing from The Purpose Institute being one of the many inspirational speakers, although the only external one on this occasion. We’re not at liberty to share what was spoken about, but what we can share is the part we see as mostly our responsibility – the engagement of the audience and the tone and style of the meeting.

The wonderful setting certainly helped; the bold and creative design of the main stage; the informal and fun tone established by the Chair and CEO; the commitment to the theme of music alongside the quality and thoughtful presentation of content – all of these things helped the engagement. We did our bit too and to finish, here’s some feedback we received over the weekend.

You are amazing at what you do, have formed great relationships with the organization and have built amazing trust and comfort so that people can really be themselves. Bravo!

You guys were simply awesome. Both in the weeks and months leading up to the meeting and in the moment. 

CEO, Global FMCG Organisation

Would you like to create an event like this one?



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Preparing for a global conference; What could possibly go wrong?!

Preparing for a global conference; What could possibly go wrong?!

After months of design, preparation and planning a large scale, global leadership conference…What could possibly go wrong?! 

 

The simple answer and the one that no one really wants to hear is quite a lot! So, we figured as we head into our big event, the least we could do, to provide reassurance, not just to our clients, but to anyone else embarking on such an endeavour, is to create a small check-list of the watch outs.

Speaker rehearsal.

Senior executives have done this kind of thing many times before and as a result, are tempted to look at the slides and then leave the rest to chance. Strongly advise them not to. It is always worth a walk through in the space to take a good look at lights, the mics, the audience seating and their timing. Beware especially the speakers that say things like “I’ll be fine on the day”. The most experienced international performers rehearse in the space, whenever they have the chance, and the smart ones take that time also to build rapport with the technical crew.

Contingency.

Ask all the ‘what if?’ questions. What if there’s a power failure and there are no slides, no music etc? What if you have to cut the presentation by 15 minutes? What if you had to step in for someone else? You don’t need to forecast catastrophe, but it’s healthy to expect the unexpected.

Keep to Time.

There really does have to be someone with authority, who is keeping everything to time. Complex events, including the movement of hundreds of people really do rely on keeping to time. If a speaker runs over by 15 minutes, they may not consider it a big deal, but the knock-on effect for the venue staff, the crew, the delegates, the other speakers can be huge. If someone is going on too long – get them off.

In the moment.

It’s difficult for anyone to focus and concentrate for a whole week, but unless you are asleep or on a break, then the only way to be is fully present. Stay in the moment, whether it’s to listen, to ask questions, to present, to help someone else, to notice something that ‘s needed. Conferences can be hard going but being fully present will help you get most from the experience.

Flex

There will be last minute changes and being able to flex and improvise can often be the answer to ensuring a smooth path. If someone is having a minor meltdown because something hasn’t arrived or their slides aren’t right, be the one that reduces the tension by providing an alternative for them. Change the order to give them time to reshape their presentation and help them do it.

Teamwork

There will be problems. If you can work well as a team, then those problems will be solved a whole lot quicker. It may require you to do things outside your normal remit. Do them, with a smile. It helps if everyone knows their role and responsibility, but don’t throw anyone under the bus, be in it together and own up quickly if you’ve made a mistake. That way it can be sorted. Before the start of the event, bring everyone together and make sure they all feel part of that team – whether chief executive or production assistant.

A story to help…

And it wouldn’t be a PM article without a story. For a one-day leadership event, focused on forecasting the future, we chose to have on stage a large Dr Who Tardis prop. Nothing wrong so far.

However, on the morning of the event, when we opened the packaging, we were a little surprised to discover a Disney Princess Castle. There were a couple of interesting conversations, but happily none about whose fault it was.

Instead, we decided to front up the mistake to the client and proceed with the castle, because it really was a fabulous prop. The result, people still remember that conference fondly and in particular, the analogy of myths and legends that we created on the fly.

Would you like to partner with us?

We are experts in bringing your business content to life, creating memorable meetings and events for your people.



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