A SUCCES story of breakout reporting.

During a conference last week in Dubrovnik for a global client, we used, as we often do, one of our favourite frameworks – SUCCES – from the book ‘Made to Stick’ by Chip and Dan Heath. They identify 6 key elements that make an idea effective and ‘sticky’ in the minds of the listeners. You don’t need every element to make an idea stick, but the more of them you have the better. Based on their research, the stickiest ideas have the following traits.

SIMPLE

UNEXPECTED

CONCRETE

CREDIBLE

EMOTIONAL

STORIES

There were two ways during the week in which this model was used to impactful effect. One was our practical application during the conference and the other was a story, told by a wonderful tour guide sharing the history of the old town of Dubrovnik.

The practical application – Bringing energy to breakout group playback

One of the challenges of large conferences and meetings is the over long and unduly repetitive ‘report backs’ from breakout sessions. What may have been a robust, lively, interesting and important discussion during the breakout can be reduced to a bland meander when played back to the plenary session by the elected representative.

Often the chosen speaker is dutifully reporting everything that was discussed but hasn’t really had time to edit it. This is further compounded by the repetition of the same points by the following groups. Somehow the requirement to be fair and include every breakout group’s feedback outweighs the common sense of not needing to hear the same point 15 times.

It really can reach the ‘losing the will to live’ moment well before the last group have brought forward their flipchart.

So, here’s a big hurrah for the Heath Brothers, because in our experience, the introduction of their model changes the way the group thinks about sharing their ideas. Last week was typical and we were inundated by people thanking us for making the session engaging, entertaining and most importantly, memorable.

Plenty of the ideas were made sticky and are going to bring about real change. They injected energy and purpose into the feedback, rather than sapping it. Alongside the model, we encouraged the participants to consult with the monsters, so they had every chance of ‘bringing their content to life’.

We encouraged the use of live music, theatre, film, dance and any and every other creative avenue. We’re delighted to report that the delegates ran with the ball.

With a focus on agility and adaptability, no group was worried about trying to be perfect and instead, put across their SIMPLE ideas in UNEXPECTED ways, using CONCRETE imagery and examples, with CREDIBLE statistics and every group, without fail, locked on to the EMOTIONAL hook and used STORY to make their point.

There were 10 groups to hear back and the time flew, making the session both enjoyable and effective.

Download more information on the SUCCES framework here  

The Tour Guide Story

The guide was well informed and engaging and shared lots of information and stories, including the wonderful fact that the head of state (the Rector) only had an elected term of 30 days and during that time, wasn’t allowed out. food for thought. One story though, really stuck with our intrepid monster tourists. Dubrovnik has a rich history, including many periods of strife and many of affluence, due to its reputation for trade and diplomacy.

At various points in history, the town was faced with devastation, famously from a huge earthquake in 1667, but on many occasions by fire.

In an attempt to make the town safer, the city council wanted to encourage householders to use more stone in construction than wood, but of course it was more expensive, so how could they influence a change in behaviour that would mean more expense for the inhabitants?

The answer – pass a law stating that only those people with stone houses would be allowed to keep and store wine on the premises and not those in wooden homes.

We leave you to consider whether or not this was an effective catalyst for change, but just a glance at the picture below, reveals a town famous for its beauty and …for its limestone and marble

If you want to know more about ideas that stick, or how to ensure that your breakout sessions have fabulous report outs, then get in touch with The Monster’s.  



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